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Whipworms in Dogs

Whipworms in Dogs

Whipworms, also known as trichuriasis, can occur in both cats and dogs and comes from a parasite (Trichuris trichiura). It is generally transmitted by ingesting infested matter, although whipworms can be contracted from other infected animals. Whipworm eggs can live in any environment and can remain dormant anywhere from a few months to years. These worms can be present in soil, food, or water, as well as in feces or animal flesh. Whipworms infect dogs of any age.

Symptoms

A whipworm infection may present itself as a large bowel inflammation or bloody diarrhea, or it may be asymptomatic. Other symptoms commonly associated with a whipworm infection include dehydration, anemia, and weight loss. It is worth noting that symptoms may begin prior to any visual evidence of whipworm eggs.

Causes

These worms are contracted when an animal ingests infested or contaminated matter such as food, water, flesh, or feces.

Diagnosis

Whipworm infection is confirmed by conducting a fecal flotation procedure on a stool sample. If parasitic eggs or whipworms are present, they will float to the surface of the glass slide.

Treatment

Animals infected with whipworm are usually treated on an outpatient basis. Veterinarians will prescribe medication to destroy both the worms and larvae living within the dog's body.

Living and Management

After a few weeks of treatment your veterinarian will require a follow-up examination to confirm that all eggs have been exterminated from the animal's system. This is generally accomplished by performing a fecal examination.

Prevention

The best prevention to this type of parasite is to keep your pet's living area sanitized. Also avoid placing your dog in confined quarters with other animals.

Whipworm | Pet Quest
Whipworm Life Cycle | Pet Quest

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7 thoughts on “Whipworms in Dogs

  1. Loved the article. I really like the fact that you include medical articles in an easy to understand format which helps to make it very educational and informative. Keep up the great work.

  2. Did you know that there are many dog owners who think that this is not a problem and that they shouldn’t worry about it. I pity the dogs of those owners.

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